Living Life One Pause at a Time

By Dr. Perry, PhD


“There is only one world, the world pressing against you at this minute. There is only one minute in which you are alive, this minute here and now. The only way to live is by accepting each minute as an unrepeatable miracle.” ~Anonymous

What if all we are is a fleeting and fragile physical manifestation of our thoughts; unconnected floating ideas that bind together to form the physical representation of your self and the world you live in?

The moment of complete awareness of the self is a sacred one that should not be wasted in anguish and confusion. Every moment is an opportunity to be fully aware and reconnect with your living force. One can create these moments of reconnection by pausing for any amount of time during the day and fully engaging in your self. Rushing through your days in a caffeinated trance will leave you feeling empty and mourning the loss of your day. The next day may start with you feeling at an anima deficit which will spiral into a feeling of playing catch up in your life. The culmination of this trance-like existence will be waking up when the credits of your life are playing. You might be left wondering, “What was it all about?”

This does not have to be the script of your life. Learn to pause and take in what is going on in your world. Take a moment now. Pause, take a breath and embrace the space around you. Take an inventory of your thoughts and how you are feeling. These occasional mental timeouts will allow you to disconnect from autopilot and take the controls of your life. Being truly aware and engaged in your life may result in you feeling every bump in the road of life, but see this as confirmation that you are living and experiencing everything life has to offer.

I take a pause at every available opportunity. The usual silence and solitude of an elevator offer me instant refuge from the world. The small elevator space instantly becomes a temple of sorts. This forced pause gives me a moment to acknowledge how I am feeling and lets me reconnect with self. Often times, if others are in the elevator, I notice there are some who are not as comfortable with the quietness and may try to engage in conversation in order to break what may be the perceived loud silence of the elevator. I wonder what would happen if they reframed their discomfort of the elevator and chose to see it as a small sacred place where they can be in silent communion with a group of strangers.

There is a fascinating study by John-Dylan Haynes, a neuroscientist at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany that questions the consciousness of our decision making. The results of this study suggest that your brain makes up its mind up to ten seconds before you realize it. By looking at brain activity while making a decision, the researchers were able to predict the choice people would make before they themselves were even aware of having made a decision. According to Frank Tong, a neuroscientist at Vanderbilt University, “The results are quite dramatic since ten seconds is a lifetime in terms of brain activity.”

This illuminating study challenges the idea of how conscious we are when we are making decisions throughout the day. It suggests that our brains are making decisions before we have any conscious awareness of what is taking place. Perhaps, the brain is acting on autopilot and is only waiting for us to disengage from it and take over. The next time you are faced with a decision, pause and reflect on your choices. By actively practicing being fully present in your life you can shed the chrysalis-stage of your existence and begin to live a full and rewarding life.

I hope you enjoyed this article. I would love to hear your thoughts and insight on this topic in the comments section below. Please note, this article is meant for educational purposes only. If you would like to schedule a free initial consultation to work with me on your mental health please click here.

Kindly,
Dr. Perry


www.MakeItUltraPsychology.com
“We specialize in a solution-focused approach to psychotherapy, specifically treating depression, anxiety, relationship issues and narcissistic abuse.”
Verified by Psychology Today


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105 responses to Living Life One Pause at a Time

  1. Really interesting article – it made me wonder how much we still react according to instinct rather than rational though process and I think it’s going to keep me wondering all day :O)

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Paul G. says:

    beautiful post! and I agree with an earlier comment, this makes you think about how aware one is in life.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. I think that is an excellent and interesting post. It reminds me of a book that I read, called The Power of Now, by Eckart Tolle. It argues that our subconscious mind is trying to take over control of our bodies and one way is does that is by making us think about the past and possibly tie ourselves in guilt and anguish over past choices or mistakes, or make us worry about the future, which is a pretty pointless waste of time. In so doing it gets to make all the decisions. I am actually quite happy to let my subconscious mind make a lot of the decisions because I worked out a long time ago that it is far more observant and clever than I would ever be. 🙂

    Liked by 7 people

  4. boomergirl47 says:

    I just read the Power of Now and it’s helped me be more present and especially to stop resisting things I can’t control. Not sure I agree 100% with everything in it, but it’s a very intriguing book.

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Kim G. says:

    Thank you! I needed this today. Usually when Friday comes around I feel like a zombie. This was a great reminder to snap out of it!

    Liked by 3 people

  6. A.M. says:

    I am not sure how you manage being a Doctor and writing so many great posts! However you do it keep it up!!!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you! I appreciate the positive feedback. This is one of my creative outlets. My only hope is that my writing is of interest and helpful to someone. Have a great day✨

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Your writing is always interesting and helpful. I don’t always comment, but I surely enjoy your explanations. They are real honest helpful and true of life. I really enjoyed the elevator suggestion. I hate elevators. Taking the time in one from now on to meditate might just be the ticket to “getting out alive!” lol. Seriously though, great idea. Loved it.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. I love this post ..actually all of them 🙂you alway get me thinking (in a good way ) and this was so interesting , I really needed to read this today , thank you as always.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Chatty Kathy says:

    Hi, great post! I am going to try to have a moment of elevator meditation tomorrow! I have to admit I am one of the chatty kathy’s that you have encountered in the elevators! thanks

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Zeal4living says:

    A mantra from the book “Your Zodiac Soul” seems to apply: “I am here, I am now, fully present as I am” – Thanks for the interesting article.

    Liked by 4 people

  11. ellie894 says:

    The world is in the busy and so much of it is worthy. But there is great truth that my soul rests in the pauses. Well written. Thank you for the wonderful reminder 😊

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Hi Ellie, indeed a pause offers us a brief moment to rest ones soul. This was beautifully put✨✨

      Liked by 3 people

  12. Geary Erua says:

    Dr. Perry, that blog post was so wonderful!
    You’re abosolutely right about that. So many people just drag through the day and not enjoy life at the PRESENT MOMENT.
    People just want to be on auto-pilot, and let their habits do the talking, while they’re worrying and stressing about what could happen in 30 minutes.

    Thank you for the blog post, I truly appreciate it.

    Sincerely,
    Geary Erua

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Hi Geary, I am very happy you like it! It is very important to be aware of the tendency to be on auto-pilot. It’s ok to let go sometimes but one has to be present for the special moments in life so as not to miss them! Have a great day my friend✨

      Liked by 3 people

  13. I really appreciate the insights of this post. I myself have started slowing down, pausing and noticing as a daily practice several times throughout my day. I think it changes the quality of my thoughts, my interactions and my overall day. Taking the body and mind OFF autopilot now and then is a helpful reminder about what is truly important.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. wvgurll says:

    I needed to see this post! I’m really going to make an effort to do this. I’ve got lots I need to let go of… this may help me do that!!

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Such a thoughtFULL post, Dr. Perry!! I’ve never exactly heard someone say that Living in the moment,( thoughtfully, rather than absent-mindedly, is the key to having a rewarding and full life. But you must be on to something–life will only be meaningful if we are actually aware of what we are doing, why we are doing it, and how we feel about it–not to mention who we are spending that time with. All those things that help us break out of the “chrysalis stage” of living… what a great metaphor! I will be taking those pause breaks more often..there is much to be mindful of, grateful for, or to simply remember to relish in.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. lunarpoet says:

    Especially the times we spend waiting at tram or bus or train stops. Many regard them as wasted lifetime. Essentially these moments are for us to claim and make into something nourishing, exactly as you described really eloquently. Great article.

    Liked by 3 people

  17. SherylBarnes says:

    The subconscious never ceases to amaze me. It’s so much faster and more powerful than our conscious minds. Unfortunately, it’s not very good at telling our conscious. Solitude is essential to hear what it’s trying to tell us. Great post!

    Liked by 3 people

  18. Robin says:

    I love the points you made about finding any quiet moment to create a “temple” for ourselves, a sacred space to disengage from the world. I’m definitely guilty of living on autopilot–it’s scary to be so aware of the world sometimes! But I can work on it, even just a moment at a time.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Hi Robin, all we can do is try our best. Thank you so much for comment and have a wonderful day✨

      Liked by 3 people

  19. Laura says:

    This is such an interesting and informative read. I’m trying hard to incorporate more mindfulness into my day and being present…It’s made a small difference already as I’ve had two small inconveniences hit me this week and, usually, I’d fly off the handle and be a spoilt brat about it; since choosing to be more mindful, I’ve handled it much calmer (and kicked off only half as much.) Thank you for sharing these words and encouraging me further into a more mindful life!

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Goff James says:

    Really enjoyed reading this article with its many intuitive insights. We live in a frenetic world and yet it is the empty spaces that speak. Have a great day.

    Liked by 3 people

  21. MaKupsy says:

    I loved this piece. I for one sometimes spend too much time worried about ticking off boxes on my to-do-list instead of taking time out to hit the reset button and simply enjoy priceless moments life has to offer. I shall do this more often 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Great post and very informative! Several years ago, due to circumstances beyond my control I was forced to pause and be still for months. This experience taught me great lessons and I grew immensely. Today, I continue this practice of being still and I can tell you it has changed my life. Every so often if I feel I’m trying to catch up with everyone else, I notice this and pull back. I think many of us are running around in a crazy state and we automatically think we have to catch this train, but we don’t! Once we realize this, it is freeing!

    Liked by 3 people

    • mhm yes! Your character building journey reveals much. It’s amazing how whatever the calamity, IF we live through it AND intentionally use it’s dense energy towards varieties of disciplines or a shift of mindset our turnover intuitive growth becomes tremendous. Nearly like, as odd as it is to say, we became a whole ‘nother person. Thank you for sharing miss. 🤗

      Liked by 2 people

  23. organicschat says:

    I’m sitting in my garden right now, pausing, my dog at my side, the wind tickling my face, as I eat my lunch outside… on a beautiful sunny day. And I’m reading about pausing. Life’s funny that way 😊

    Liked by 3 people

  24. Ilka says:

    For me, often it is so much difficult to secure some minutes of stillness each day for myself. I need stillness as much as breathing air. The wisdoms of silence are the only we should follow, for the simple reason that they come from our great inner self.

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Insightful post as always Dr. Perry. 10 seconds? Leaves me much to think about. It may well just become a habit of mine to read your blog religiously. Becareful 😉😁

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Another great post. It’s easy to be on an autopilot mode because it takes less effort for mundane daily tasks. I think it takes a commitment to truly live in the moment because there is fear of missing out or left behind if you slow down. I think it just might be the most important commitment of all because it’s for your own happiness and sanity.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. I seriously needed to see your post this morning! I’ve been trying to becoming more aware and present in each day! It’s challenging! I fight “autopilot” daily! Or… should I fight it knowing my brain has already got it figured out? In which case, I just need to sit back and enjoy the ride! Looking forward to more posts!

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Annie Huhta says:

    Dr. Perry,

    I have a testimony using the practice of pause and how it can have a positive impact in our lives. I have been aware of the power of pausing to evaluate my decisions for about a year now but I have really begun to practice using this technique for the past six months. In that time I have noticed I am more aware of my emotions and how they affect the decisions I am making. When I take the time to pause and evaluate I am much more present and accountable-as you suggest in your writing. The most difficult part for me is catching my emotions in time; with practice this does get easier.

    Annie

    Liked by 2 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Hi Annie, Thank you so much for sharing this. We all have some days when it is more difficult to slow down and pause before we act. As you mentioned, it gets easier with practice. Have a wonderful evening and thank you for your comment✨

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Inspiring and truth in your words, Dr. Perry. Yes I so agree with you that every moment is a miracle and we need to pause and be quiet in our silence to think and take note of what we are thinking and how it is affecting us. Thanks for the knowledgeable share.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Ooi Zao May says:

    Yes, sometimes I feel that I need a lot of courage to make an unexpected decision or resort to a new course of action in handling an issue. Besides, sometimes I tend to communicate with people through the fixed set of questions. 😄

    Liked by 2 people

  31. chris2041 says:

    Having just finished my morning meditation, pause, this post was very relevant. It reminded me of the practice of mindfulness, taking a moment to become aware of my mind. Thanks for an interesting post.

    Liked by 2 people

  32. toinspireus says:

    I find myself pausing more now to pay attention to what the Universe is sharing with me visually based off my imagination, Say for instance, I have always dreamed of one day owning a Motor Coach and lately they have been in my view quite frequently. So I think its wonderful to live one pause at a time.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. You may think I have missed the point, but what you said had value to me. I have been reading, writing, reading some more and writing for hours this morning. Now I am sitting in the backyard. I opened wordpress and found your blog. I have taken a few minutes to close my eyes, pause and listen to the sounds around me. The sounds of the birds singing a plane overhead, the hum of the cars on the highway nearby. It is so quiet and peaceful. I love the feel of the warm sunshine and the cool breeze on my body. I opened my eyes, looked around me at the majestic green pine trees, the pretty blue sky, the fluffy white clouds, even my dogs sitting in the grass. This pause and moment of relaxation will be the best part of my day today. I do not take enough time to sit back, relax, and en joy the day that God has given me. It is a beautiful spring like day today. Thank you so much for your blog. Even though I have not done self examination today, the pause has done me good. I think I will continue for a little while longer….

    Liked by 1 person

  34. I love the analogy of the elevator as temple where the silence offers opportunities to reconnect with self. “The sacred now”. as it were. Thanks for another inspirational article. I enjoyed it very much.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Synergy says:

    I think this post made me understand someone I was upset with earlier a bit better. I felt conflicted because my heart understood something my mind was bringing resistance to. Although I’ve learnt the hard way to not ignore my heart. I still gotta negotiate with my mind so it quietens down. How I do that is by being aware of my thoughts without identifying with it. The thought I had was centred around how this person can make a decision and not be aware of it in actual moment. My heart believed and felt the truth in this my mind put up resistance.

    This was a synchronicity
    Thank you for sharing

    Liked by 1 person

  36. B🌹 says:

    It always relates back to mindfulness in the moment. Cherishing each breathe and our surroundings. Most of the time I’m so busy with work I’m on auto mode. Very informative article!

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Lancelot says:

    Great article. The best ones always have simplicity at their heart. My pause is my writing and so a poem a day keeps me present – what do I see, experience or feel now – write about it. Finding a routine to “hard wire presence in the present” is a good trick! Keep on writing

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for sharing this great tip. I am glad you like this post and I hope to continue writing for a very long time✨

      Liked by 2 people

  38. aquis says:

    Such an interesting, thought provoking article, I truly enjoyed it! Reminded me of the power of self reflection and meditation 🙏🏻 Thank you for sharing ☺️☀️

    Liked by 1 person

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