Find Meaning In Your Life

By Dr. Perry, PhD


“There’s nothing like impending death to rouse you from existential boredom.” ~Roger Ebert

One of my pet peeves is to hear others complain about how bored they are with life. They wonder out loud, “What is the purpose of it all if we are going to die anyway?” To be bored with our life is a luxury we cannot afford and should not indulge.

I believe that this combination of boredom and the unreasonable belief that time can be wasted without repercussions is due primarily to not having a clear meaning for your life. Meaning can be found in the most beautiful moments of life as well as the most heart wrenching ones. Often, the meaning of one’s life is found after you have crossed paths with death. After an encounter with the possibility of nonexistence, we tend to renew our vows to life. Suddenly, life appears to be a luminous blotch of bright colors surrounded by a vast sea of unknown dark shadows. From our vantage point, death appears ominous and threatening as it encircles the luminosity of life.

Death however has a purpose. Death reminds us of the frailty of life and the banality of our everyday stressors. Death highlights how truly special life is. Life is anything but boring. We are fortunate to be alive even if it is for a comparatively short amount of time. The very fact that life is so fragile as well as unique (for we have yet to find other life forms in the constellations), should be more than enough reason to cherish it. You are part of the human race and it took a unique combination of factors and incredible odds to make you. Life does not distinguish between races, genders or any other variable that makes humans distinct from one another. Quite simply, you are part of the living.

Acknowledging that death exists is the catalyst for truly realizing how awe-inspiring life is. You are alive and because of that you have an obligation to those that have died, to live fully and never take any of the time you have for granted.

To find purpose and meaning in life is to quench the fire of existential angst. I am not going to presume to know the meaning of your life. The quest for the meaning of life has been much discussed philosophically, scientifically, theologically and even psychologically. We all will have a unique perspective on the meaning of life made up of unique variables. You alone can identify your purpose in life and find meaning in your life’s events.

Next time you feel compelled to share how bored you are with your life, ask yourself whether there is something more you could be doing to honor your time.

Thank you for taking a moment to visit my blog. I hope you enjoyed this post. I would like to hear your thoughts on how you have found meaning in your life.

Kindly,
Dr. Perry


www.MakeItUltraPsychology.com
“We specialize in a solution-focused approach to psychotherapy, specifically treating depression, anxiety, relationship issues and narcissistic abuse.”
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120 responses to Find Meaning In Your Life

  1. Analyn says:

    I received some very difficult news today. My father was diagnosed with a late stage form of cancer. My heart is broken. Reading this post brought me to tears even though I have already shed many tears today. I don’t know how any of this is going to go for our family. I have never dealt with death ever in my life, let alone my dad. He is my best friend. Sad doesn’t do justice to how I am feeling. I’m sorry for rambling. It’s just .. a lot. I am praying and praying that the treatments will work. Thank you for writing this post. It’s exactly what I needed today.

    Liked by 10 people

  2. M.B. says:

    Beautiful post. After my husband passed away I dedicated myself to living the best life I could live. Every day I remind myself how precious life is. Thank you

    Liked by 8 people

  3. Maria says:

    This post is so true. We complain so much about our lives and fail to see how everyday is a miracle and a blessing. Thank you Dr. Perry

    Liked by 9 people

  4. shineb4 says:

    My grandpa would always say “Boredom is a lack of intelligence.” I can’t ever recall a moment I have ever been bored. I grew up with such a wonder for life and understanding and life is unlimited to learning.

    Liked by 7 people

  5. Death is a powerful motivator. I’m watching my neighbour – a beautiful, vibrant, independent woman who stands out in any crowd – fade away, dying a slow and painful death. It’s a heartbreaking reminder that our time is finite.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      So true and so sad. We need to fully embrace our happy moments and loved ones. They are like insulation to the hard times we all must face. Thank you for sharing such powerful insight✨

      Liked by 3 people

  6. tamarakhodr says:

    This is a fantastic piece. Thank you for this! It speaks to my soul! I learnt that my purpose is to help others after my personal near death experience, which I’m totally grateful for! I’m still not sure exactly how to help, but I try to do what agrees with my soul as much as possible and remember that sometimes I need to fill my own cup in order to fill others’. I’ve always had trouble finding my calling and I would appreciate some advice in how to figure that out 🙂

    Liked by 6 people

  7. B🌹 says:

    Life is unique in regards to each and every person on this earth. Many times, I have struggled to find the meaning of life. Was I put on this earth to work 9 to 5 M-F and not achieve my own dreams? Probably not! As for me, I’m still searching… However, I do know we are meant to help one another, to support one another and if possible bring new life into this crazy, yet beautiful world. Amazing post, something I needed to read this morning! I appreciate the catalyst given to me.

    Liked by 5 people

  8. I love helping people – that is what gives meaning to my life. Hearing individual stories and sharing my own experiences gives me joy. Yes, death is part of life and I actually have been thinking about it a fair bit – autumn brings many anniversaries of various deaths in my family and as you say it does help me cherish this great gift. We only have one. I hope to make a difference, no matter how small. And that also gives meaning and purpose to my daily doings. I enjoy your blog. Thanks for sharing your thoughts on life, death, and meaning.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for your comment Carol. I often visit your blog and enjoy the way you write. I can tell you are a very caring and positive person. I hope you continue sharing your much needed positivity. Have a great day✨

      Liked by 5 people

      • Aw, that’s so kind of you. I am far from perfect, but I do believe in positive thinking. Thanks so much – both for your kind words and for visiting my little blog. Have a wonderful week!

        Liked by 4 people

  9. rashu2015 says:

    I actually stopped saying “I am bored” thanks to my husband who always used to tell me that never ever he felt bored in his entire life because there is so much to do, so much to learn.

    Liked by 6 people

  10. deviantdaeva says:

    A lot of philosophers have contemplated the idea of the meaning of life, and it is hard to not one day be faced with the reality of meaninglessness, limited time and also limited possibilities. I like the existentialist approaches. Schopenhauer, for instance, says that however much we are stuck in a meaningless reproductive cycle and however little we can control the universe and its arbitrary functions, we can still choose to focus on the things that bring us joy and embrace us with beauty, the small things can bring meaning too.
    Sartre on the other hand thinks that we need to overcome our fear of death and instead accept it as part of life, and that we need to acknowledge its existence to be able to live life to the fullest. Without the pressure of things being limited in time, we might avoid living and only exist in the circles of every day life meaninglessness. One thing that I find especially interesting with him is that he thinks we have a choice when it comes to death, we can always choose death, we can not remove the possibility of it, but we can at any point choose it, and hence we have some sort of control over it. For him that poses a positive possibility because it can decrease the fear of death.
    Interesting post, thank you for taking this topic up!

    Liked by 7 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for your insight on the topic. You stated it beautifully and made me want to read Sartre. Have a wonderful day✨

      Liked by 3 people

  11. This gave me a bit of a lump in my throat when reading. I’m in a very strange and scary time in my life and this is a wonderful reminder of how precious life is. I’m trying so hard to build my life back up. This put it into perspective – to think of those in a far worse position as there is always someone going through something worse. Life is truly a gift.

    Liked by 6 people

  12. Vivian says:

    I really enjoyed reading this reflective post today. 😄 Life is a precious gift and each moment is to be cherished. After experiencing traumatic brain injury, and all that comes with it, I’ve found so much purpose in writing to encourage others who also suffer. If it weren’t for my TBI journey I would have never, ever decided to blog or found so many others experiencing hardships that I can relate to. So in a way, TBI has been a gift and now I’ve found my purpose. God bless you! I always love your articles and quotes and look forward to them.

    Liked by 7 people

  13. KJ Smith says:

    “You are alive and because of that you have an obligation to those that have died, to live fully and never take any of the time you have for granted.” So good!

    Liked by 6 people

  14. sarkless says:

    Excellent post! I couldn’t agree more. I have dealt with depression on and off since I was 15. Often the cause of my depression is a lack of willingness to believe in myself and my goals – its all just too much sometimes. I have learnt that meaning can be found in the simplest of things, like having a cup of tea and reading the day away when you can’t imagine being able to do anything more productive – knowing that its OK not to be OK and that the feeling of hopelessness will only stick around if I don’t look after my soul every day. While I think its important to aim high, I think its also important to remove certain expectations and believe that you will get to your goal in good time. Like Nelson Mandela said ‘I have so much to do today I will have to pray for 3 hours just to get it done’. He tackled his tasks after looking after his soul, rather than applying more pressure and stress – and he sure accomplished a lot.

    Liked by 5 people

  15. Great post, when we think about it, we really have a very short time left in life. If we are lucky to see 90 and beyond we hope that most of the later years are healthy and functional. Life brings tough challenges as well as good times, I want to get in as many experiences as I possibly can. So when I’m ready to die, I can say I enjoyed my life as this person I am now in this body and to know that I will never be this person again, I want to give her as much life experience as possible, so she could take those experiences with her on her last breathe of life.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Thank you for bringing the subject up Dr. Perry. I have a different perspective. That is there is actually no death to our Self. The body comes and goes, of course, but if we can know we (as the consciousness of the body) go on, then the stress of the short life is eliminated and so would boredom…which, after all, is a reaction to stress. If Eternity had an emotion it would be Patience.

    Liked by 4 people

  17. Frances Sullivan says:

    Wonderfully stated thoughts – eloquent, succinct, and thought-provoking. Lovely writing.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. I had a coworker who retired and then 6 months later came back because she was “bored.” Huh? I’ve been through unemployment and was so busy with job hunting and networking that I had trouble making time to do housework and rest. I was not the only unemployed person who was so on the go they wondered how they ever had time to have a career. Even if I am able to retire, I have so many interests that I will never be bored.

    Liked by 4 people

  19. Chad Zizelman says:

    Great post! This is a subject that my wife and I often meditate and study on. Taking into consideration these viewpoints, it allows you to step away from stress and focus on the joys of life. Excited to read more of your future posts!

    Liked by 4 people

  20. theoutspokenintrovet says:

    This is (another) very interesting piece. Your perspective is motivational and eye opening. As cliché as it sounds, our lives are what we make of them so if someone is bored of theirs they are clearly not making the most of it and it is up to them to become un-bored

    Liked by 4 people

  21. Beautifully said! I’m not one given to suffering from boredom, never have been. There’s simply too much life to live and too little time to do it! Learning something new, trying something new, experiencing something new are opportunities available to each one of us. Grasp on, take hold, try something new. It doesn’t have to be something terrifying, just new, something you’ve never tried before. Life is precious! Every moment counts! Make as many as possible noteworthy! 🙂 Loved this, Dr. Perry, very much!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you so much! I agree. As I get older I find myself contemplated life and it’s beauty almost on a regular basis. I don’t want to waste a minute of it. Have a wonderful day✨

      Liked by 2 people

  22. Great post! Your statement that “Often, the meaning of one’s life is found after you have crossed paths with death” really captures it. In our culture, we seem to hide from death. We remove ourselves from it. Make sure it happens in hospitals and nursing homes. I was exposed to death early. Taught me to value each moment. Each breath is precious 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      What you state is true. Death is taboo in our culture. It’s a part of life and acceptance of that makes life more meaningful. Thank you for your insightful comment!✨

      Liked by 3 people

  23. I don’t think I recall ever saying I was bored. Maybe when I was a child, but not as an adult. I’ve never had a brush with death, however, after my ex-husband told me he wanted a divorce, that was the first time I have ever contemplated death. That was a tough time to pull through. But I’m here and I’m stronger than ever I believe. I cherish my life. I even got my first tattoo at age 47 and part of it is a semi-colon…yup I followed that movement. It’s the word Strength, where the first ‘t’ is a cross and above the word is a semi-colon with a butterfly on the semi-colon. The cross and the word are pretty self-explanatory. The semi-colon means my life could have ended, but I chose to go on and the butterfly signifies new life after my divorce. As tough as it is being single and behind on all my bills, I cherish my life…every single second of it. Praise God! Thank you for this most beautiful post!!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for your beautiful comment Dottie! I am happy you are here sharing your wisdom. Wishing you well✨✨✨

      Liked by 3 people

  24. When you feel bored, it is not because you don’t have anything to do, but because you don’t have passion for the options that you have. Nowadays it is too easy to numb that feeling, because on Internet you can quickly find an entertainment that doesn’t engage you mentally, but occupies your time, so you kind of trick the feeling of emptiness. Even though I generally feel great passion for life, I sometimes find myself doing that, because every now and then I get lost on my way, I guess.

    Liked by 6 people

  25. I love this. Agreed. Wish I could have more perspective like this every day and see the wonderful colors. Sometimes, I get so bogged down or overly-existential in my thinking, as you say. And, really, we should just stop thinking so much and start living more and being more grateful and less bored!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      At times we all need a reminder that we do not live forever and as you say “stop thinking so much and start living.” Have a wonderful day✨

      Liked by 2 people

  26. innervoice28 says:

    This was an excellent post Dr .Perry …Meaningful Indeed ….One should always have a definite purpose of his / her life ….Otherwise ,life just becomes a number in between those dashes …..

    Liked by 4 people

  27. Ash says:

    I enjoyed this piece. I love how you reminded us that we have the power to choose our purpose in life and the meaning behind events that occur. Thank you for sharing 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you so much for taking the time to read the post and commenting. I appreciate the feedback!✨

      Liked by 4 people

  28. wisemystic says:

    Thanks Dr. Perry for this valuable piece. It took me a decade to find out my true purpose in life. I was imbecile enough to chase after something which wasn’t meant for me.

    Liked by 3 people

  29. notdonner says:

    I had a discussion with a buddy of mine last month about people who seem to want things to collapse, looking always at how “messed up” everything is, and pessimistic about the future. Go make a positive difference in someone’s life. I am empathetic but not very tolerant of people who say these things.

    Liked by 4 people

  30. driftyness says:

    I used to say that I was bored a lot as a kid. My parents used to tell me that I shouldn’t be bored but I didn’t really understand what they meant. Now that I’m older, I get it. Being bored says something about my mindset – it means there are a lot of things I’m not seeing and appreciating! I think a good way to avoid boredom is helping others and turning our attention outwards instead of inwards. And I agree with your great point that if we’re tempted to feel bored, we should think about what actions we’re not taking and then take those steps! Your passion for life really came through in this post, and so did a poetic side to your writing! I enjoyed this, thank you 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for sharing your insight! I’m glad you enjoyed the post and I appreciate your compliment✨

      Liked by 3 people

  31. Jay says:

    Just like you, I won’t pretend I know the meaning of life, but what gives my own life meaning are two things: activity and people. Activity can be exercise, writing, reading, just doing things makes me feel like I’m alive. And people – those few one can’t live without – make life meaningful outside my own (sometimes selfish, sometimes really necessary) needs. Thanks for another great post!

    Liked by 3 people

  32. I find meaning because I am. I have the privilege each day when I open my eyes to do something. I chose that something to be positive always. Just this Friday I was met with a decision of going one way or another. It was a tough decision but I chose the right way.

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Bindu says:

    Those who have been there and back would truly know how it feels. And one should listen to their words. People and caring for them should be part of the living process.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Yes, Dr. Perry! Thank you.
    And might i say that when you write from your heart like this, using your experience and insights of course, you are touching human hearts and minds at a much deeper level than the basically informational style posts.
    Just say’in, because we need it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for taking the time to read this. I am very happy this post resonated with you. I agree with what you are saying and I will do my best✨

      Liked by 2 people

  35. Thank you for this important post, Dr. Perry! It astounds me when people can say they are bored with their lives. I believe having the “privilege” of being bored simply means one hasn’t lived enough, seen enough, or perhaps, suffered enough, to come through the other end just happy to be surviving and having a chance to create more moments of thriving! It is ironic that us humans have to be put through failures, challenges, and trauma to see the true beauty of living: the limitless value of experiencing each moment as if it were our last, and therefore making the most of every day that’s given to us as a gift.

    Liked by 1 person

  36. janetsm says:

    I have been blessed my entire life to have interest in many things. I cannot imagine being bored, and I pity those who find themselves in such a state.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Hope says:

    For me, even though I am retired, I DON’T have enough time. If anyone wants to share some of their time I would appreciate. For one (1) be happy you woke up in the morning! 😉
    My son 🧐asks me every day “what did you do today”? 😯My answer was a little of this, a little of that. Then I thought why not write it down. Now when he asks me “what I did”, get my notebook 📓out and give him what his smart, witty, non-bored, “bonkers” mom did. 😉☺

    Liked by 1 person

  38. AHolyCalling says:

    Omg. So many points in one post has me excited about reading another good read from you. But here are some of my best.
    1. unreasonable belief that time can be wasted without repercussions
    2. The very fact that life is so fragile as well as unique should be more than enough reason to cherish it. 
    3. To find purpose and meaning in life is to quench the fire of existential angst

    Thanks again for inspiring life.

    Liked by 1 person

  39. You know I’ve got so much uncertainty but when I’m making music and in the studio I feel so alive so I suppose the one thing that brings me life as opposed to bringing meaning to life is working towards making my life/music career a success.

    Liked by 2 people

  40. I was spiraling down into depression lately – I guess… I slept 12-14 hours a day and did only watch videos/movies…
    then I realized today that I’m in charge.

    I like to write about inspirational, motivational realizations of mine on my blog. Although one thing people tend to forget to mention: you need to record your findings and REVISIT them once a while. Humans we forget sometimes that we or someone else around had already figured out some powerful ideas about life, which can potentially solve our currently pressing issues.

    As bible says: there is nothing new under the sun. [ecc]
    So true… don’t forget, you have already found solutions or ideas can ease your pressing problems of today, at your past.

    Thanks Dr Perry for reassuring that life is about finding meaning. Finding meaning is about finding passion. Passion is created by action, not the other way around.
    So here it first come action: today, I applied for a journalism course I’ve been looking at for over a half year now. 🙃💪🏼

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Thank you for sharing your insight. Congratulations on signing up for the journalism course!✨

      Liked by 2 people

  41. joylennick says:

    Hi Dr. Perry, Thank you for commenting on my poem and for your article. Although I’m more mature than mature… (while feeling 40 mentally), it is true what you say about age and mortality. It concentrates the mind beautifully…Of course many of us realise that we could die at any time, but somehow – when young – we are so busy LIVING, we don’t give it a thought. If we become parents (I have three sons), quite suddenly their lives become more precious than gold, and the thought of them dying is too terrible to contemplate. Sadly, the passing years take away some of our dear friends and family and we have to learn to cope with grief. But now, strangely enough, although I can hear the clock ticking loud and clear, I am open to all the simple joys of life and appreciate everything as if new-found. Despite several tragedies (the norm in most peoples lives) I have been blessed with a wonderful husband, sons, family and friends and am still as curious and learning more about life each day. I am fascinated by people, music, all the arts and in particular, writing and hope to stay on my perch until around ninety… Best wishes.

    Liked by 2 people

  42. JanBeek says:

    Dr. Perry, you asked us, your readers, to share how we are finding – or have found – meaning in our life. I’ve read 113 responses to this thoughtful blog, and have seen your kind responses to each, acknowledging the comments. In one response you said, “As I get older I find myself contemplated life and it’s beauty almost on a regular basis.“ That response resonated with me. 🤗Approaching 80, I realize I’m entering the last quarter of my life (although I watched an amazing 109 year old on You Tube today… so maybe it’s not my last quarter after all!), anyway… like you, as I celebrate each passing day, I contemplate life, its meaning and its beauty more often, too. I find meaning in gratitude. In my “Thankfulness Journal” I record daily at least 5 things for which I’m grateful. In my prayer journal, I list the answered prayers as well as the ones I continue to request. I acknowledge the goodness around me, thank God for my blessings, and open my heart to the ways in which I can use this day of life to help others. In giving I find life worth living. Give thanks. Give help. Give love. Your blog helps others reflect on life and living and what gives us and our days meaning. Thank you for doing that! I’m glad I follow your “makeitultrapsychology” even though that intimidating, academic title kept me away for awhile! 🤪❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dr. Perry says:

      Hi Jan, I am so glad we found each other’s blogs. I don’t want my blog to be intimidating! I want to be able to contribute only in a positive way. Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful insight. I wish you many more happy and healthy years to come and look forward to your knowledgeable insight on this blog and on your blog. Have a wonderful day ❤️

      Liked by 2 people

  43. Relatable post. While I haven’t really been bored since I was a teenager it’s true that it’s because one hasn’t figured out in what meaningful ways you can spend your time (yet).

    I was confronted with death at a young age so I can attest to that motivating me to find my own meaning. There can be no darkness without light.

    Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

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